Book Review of Sedulity by David Forsyth

81k2I0oXNzL._SL1500_I try to avoid reading books in the same genre as my work-in-progress, for a number of reasons I won’t explain—you’d end up scratching your head and concluding that I’m a bit “touched in the head.” You might think that already. When I finished (for now) The Perseid Collapse series, I treated myself to a novel I have been watching for several months, SEDULITY.  David Forsyth’s book burned up the Amazon charts when it launched in March, and is still making waves…I’m playing with words related to the asteroid strike in his book. It’s early, and coffee has not been delivered to my office. My family takes the day off from catering to me on Saturday. I’m not a completely evil overlord. Anyway, aside from having a completely cool last name (Frederick Forsyth is one of my favorite authors), David wrote an incredible disaster tale. We both incorporate asteroids in our latest series, but tell a completely different story following  the impact…not to mention that David’s asteroid is way bigger than mine. I know—Asteroid envy—not a healthy sentiment. Check out my review of SEDULITY and grab a copy for $2.99.

 

 

“Like the Rogue asteroid in Forsyth’s blistering tale of a modern apocalypse, Sedulity took me by complete surprise when I started reading…and didn’t let go until I had devoured the entire novel—in short order!

Sedulity, named after the luxury cruise liner at the center of Forsyth’s novel, is a masterfully complex apocalyptic tale, combining every element I find essential to the genre. Strong character development, intense action sequences, and big picture connections.

In the beginning, we are introduced to a variety of characters, from different walks of life. The ship’s captain and wife, a normal couple on a once-in-a-lifetime cruise with their daughter, a self-absorbed Texan-oil baron and a humble ship’s bartender…the perfect kaleidoscope to view the soon to arrive disaster—Rogue, a one mile wide asteroid, described in chilling detail by Forsyth as it races toward the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

I loved the juxtaposition of personal character driven sequences with the matter-of-fact description of the asteroid’s effects. On one hand you are thrust into chaotic, high-octane survival scenes testing the limits of the characters’ endurance, on the other, you are shown the inevitable and brutally effective nature of the disaster’s impact on the natural environment. I kept thinking “this isn’t personal,” but Forsyth jars you out of this reverie and slams you back into a seat on the Sedulity, where the catastrophe feels 100% realistic and very personal.

Action sequences are intense, perfectly described and not for the faint of heart…not over the top gory, just realistic and impactful. Forsyth injects an appropriate amount of dry humor at times, which I greatly appreciated in the absolute chaos unfolding on the ship. The author leaves no stone unturned when it comes to the effects of the asteroid strike. I knew a wave would hit the ship…the rest was completely and pleasantly unexpected, which brings me to the final genre element that I love. 

This isn’t simply a story about the trials and tribulations of the crew and passengers of the Sedulity. Forsyth’s vision extends far beyond my simple assumption, and promises to deliver an incredible post-apocalyptic series on par with Lucifer’s Hammer. I eagerly await the second installment.”

1 Comment

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One response to “Book Review of Sedulity by David Forsyth

  1. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. I really appreciate your efforts and I am waiting for
    your further write ups thank you once again.

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